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Where to Camp in Algonquin Park

    A vast interior of maple hills, rocky ridges, and thousands of lakes makes up the essence of Algonquin, which covers an area of 7,635 square kilometres of forests, bogs, lakes, and rivers. Only by paddle or on foot can you get into the heart of this park and see everything it has to offer.

    Moreover, there is a second Algonquin, which is located along a 56-kilometer stretch of Highway 60. Camping at one of eight campgrounds, hiking one of 14 interpretive trails, participating in the extensive educational Discovery Program, and visiting Algonquin’s exceptional Visitor Center, Logging Museum, and Art Center are all available.

    Visitor attractions are just as plentiful during winter months than during summer months at this park. Come check out the diverse range of activities, which include camping, comfortable yurts, skiing, snowshoeing, and ice skating, among others.

    A Practical Guide to the Campgrounds in Algonquin Park

    campground on the shores of Rock Lake

    Rock Lake Campground is located further away from Highway 60 than any of the other developed camping areas in Algonquin Provincial Park. The campground, which can be reached via an 8-kilometer gravel road, is located on the northeast shore of beautiful Rock Lake, on two pine-shaded points of land. In terms of seclusion from your camping neighbours (or day-trippers travelling along Rock Lake Road), these campsites more than make up for it by offering breathtaking views, a beautiful sandy beach, and incredible canoeing opportunities on the island, rock, and cliff-studded Rock Lake. The campground is also only a short walk from the beginning of the wonderful Booth’s Rock Trail, which runs through the forest. Cyclists have direct access to the eastern end of the 16-kilometer-long Old Railway Bike Trail from this location.

    Brent Campground 

    Brent Campground is located in the heart of Algonquin Park’s northernmost section. There are 30 campsites available, but there are no showers or laundry facilities, and there are no electrical hookups. The campground is located on Cedar Lake, which is a beautiful lake for day paddling. Algonquin Outfitters has a location near the campground, so you can easily rent a canoe if you want to go canoeing.

    Campground on the Lake of Two Rivers

    The Lake of Two Rivers Campground offers campsites on a large and beautiful lake with a wonderful beach for swimming. It is also the oldest and most popular campground in Algonquin Park, as well as one of the most historic. The campground is surrounded by a forest of white pine trees, and the campsites are extremely spacious, with an acceptable level of privacy between them.

    THE TEA LAKE

    Tea Lake Campground has fewer than 50 campsites and is a small campground. There are flush toilets, a laundry facility, and shower facilities, but there are no electrical hookups at this location. However, because of the presence of cedar trees in some of the campsites, the view of the water is impeded. There is also a beach nearby, which is ideal for swimming and canoeing.

    Campground at Coon Lake

    One of Algonquin Park’s Highway 60 camping areas, Tiny Coon Lake Campground is the most remote and undeveloped. For those who prefer a more traditional camping experience, Coon Lake has an added bonus: a little-known side trail connects campers to the Centennial Ridges Trail, a breathtaking 10-kilometer loop that offers day hikers some of the most breathtaking views in Algonquin Park. The Booth’s Rock Trail and the Old Railway Bike Trail, both of which are equally beautiful, are located just a short distance away.

    Concluding Remarks

    If you found this post useful, I hope you now have a better idea of which campground you’d like to stay at during your next visit to Algonquin Park as a result of reading it. Honestly, it’s difficult to go wrong with any of them because they each have something unique to offer.

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